Browsing All posts tagged under »difference principle«

Meritocracy Gone Wrong: Work for Reward, Reward for What? Examining the justice of exam-based meritocracy in Singapore from a Rawlsian perspective

December 6, 2017

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by Tan Yi-Qin Edina INTRODUCTION Despite Singapore’s high literacy rate of 96.8%, she also has one of the highest wealth inequalities in the world[1]. Given that education, especially when successfully administered nation-wide, is supposed to play a huge role as a social-economic leveller, it is clear that somewhere, something went wrong. Is Singapore’s huge wealth […]

Loneliness is political: understanding loneliness in society through a Rawlsian lens

December 6, 2017

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by Tan Xian Li Joshua We are becoming lonelier as a society. Laura Alcock-Ferguson, writing for City Lab, says that loneliness is a crisis – “one of the greatest challenges we face as a society” [1]. Vivek Murthy, writing for the Harvard Business Review, points out that “the world is suffering from an epidemic of […]

Should Singapore Implement the Minimum Wage?

December 6, 2017

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by Kwek Jia Qi A minimum wage is the lowest remuneration an employee must receive. In US, the federal minimum wage is USD $7.25/hour; in UK, the minimum wage is £7.50/hour; in France it is €9.76/hour[1]. In Singapore, however, there is no minimum wage. This government rejects minimum wage for three reasons. First, employees are […]

Streaming in Singapore: Is Mere Evolution in Education Enough for Equality?

December 6, 2017

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by Hoo Yong Chuan, Shawn With effect from 2021, the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) scoring system will be modified to reduce the number of possible scores from over 200 to just 29. The changes announced in 2016 to the Singapore student’s first major national examination was aimed at promoting holistic education and reducing stress […]

Singapore’s Riches: How Much is Too Much? Rethinking Pro-Wealth Policies in Consideration of the Rest

December 6, 2017

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by Dinh Hai Bao Lien   73% of total country wealth is controlled by the wealthiest 20%. The poorest 20%, on the other hand, handles 1% of overall wealth[1].   Why is this the case?   There is strong institutional and sociocultural evidence for how the Singapore system supports wealth and wealth accumulation.   PART […]

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